For appointments or questions call (540) 283-6000.

5 Essential Nutrients for Men’s Health

Research shows that 77% of men are deficient in magnesium, and many don’t take in enough vitamin D, too. Read on to find out what 5 essential nutrients you might be missing out on – and how to get them:

Vitamin D

Many know that vitamin D is essential for strengthening your skeleton, but it has other benefits, too. Vitamin D might reduce inflammation in your arteries, helping mitigate the chance of a stroke or heart attack.

When the sun’s rays penetrate your skin, vitamin D is created in your body. However, the vitamin D you stockpile in the summertime is often depleted by the winter months – especially from November through February.

Combat your vitamin D deficiency by visiting your doctor. Ask for bloodwork – if your vitamin D blood level is less than 30 nanograms per milliliter, consider a supplement and multivitamin. Consuming 1,400 IU of vitamin D per day will boost blood levels of D. Tuna, orange juice, milk, yogurt and eggs are good dietary sources of this essential nutrient.

Magnesium

This lightweight mineral is involved in more than 300 bodily processes. Physicians believe that low levels of magnesium might increase levels of C-reactive protein – a key factor of heart disease.

Nutrition surveys show that we’re only consuming about 80% of the recommend 400 mg of magnesium daily. Without enough magnesium, your body struggles to generate energy.

Magnesium-rich foods, like navy beans and halibut are good dietary sources of magnesium, but most men, won’t reach the 400 mg recommended daily allowance (RDA) through diet alone. Invest in a 250 mg magnesium supplement for optimal results.   

Vitamin B12

Vitamin B12 is perhaps you brain’s biggest champion. Older men with low levels of B12 lose brain volume faster than those with higher levels.

Vitamin B12 exists naturally in salmon, lamb, and other meats. The most available source is fortified cereal – eat a bowl of 100% B12-fortified cereal with milk each day. 

While most men get the RDA of 2.4 micrograms through dietary sources, certain medications, such as acid-blockers and those for controlling diabetes, can contribute to b12 deficiencies. Speak with your physician about tracking your B12 levels if you regularly take acid-blocking or diabetes drugs, and start a supplement regimen. 

Potassium

Potassium helps your cells use glucose for energy – this essential mineral keeps your heart beating, muscles contracting, and brain functioning. It also naturally regulates your sodium levels, lowering your blood pressure and reducing your heart attack risk.

Despite the importance of this vital nutrient, up to 70% of men don’t consume the recommended 4,700 mg daily.

Avocadoes are packed with 500 mg of potassium, while bananas contain 400 mg. If you’re not a fruit fan, consider a potato – a single large spud carries 1,600 mg of potassium.

Iodine

Iodine helps control how efficiently your thyroid gland burns calories. Thus, insufficient iodine intake might leave you feeling fatigued or cause you to gain weight.

Don’t rely solely on salt for iodine – not all food manufacturers use iodized salt, and iodized salt itself doesn’t always meet recommended daily intake requirements for this nutrient.

Iodine can be found in nearly sodium-free foods like milk, eggs and yogurt.  

 

Research shows that 77% of men are deficient in magnesium, and many don’t take in enough vitamin D, too. Read on to find out what 5 essential nutrients you might be missing out on – and how to get them:

Vitamin D

Many know that vitamin D is essential for strengthening your skeleton, but it has other benefits, too. Vitamin D might reduce inflammation in your arteries, helping mitigate the chance of a stroke or heart attack.

When the sun’s rays penetrate your skin, vitamin D is created in your body. However, the vitamin D you stockpile in the summertime is often depleted by the winter months – especially from November through February.

Combat your vitamin D deficiency by visiting your doctor. Ask for bloodwork – if your vitamin D blood level is less than 30 nanograms per milliliter, consider a supplement and multivitamin. Consuming 1,400 IU of vitamin D per day will boost blood levels of D. Tuna, orange juice, milk, yogurt and eggs are good dietary sources of this essential nutrient.

Magnesium

This lightweight mineral is involved in more than 300 bodily processes. Physicians believe that low levels of magnesium might increase levels of C-reactive protein – a key factor of heart disease.

Nutrition surveys show that we’re only consuming about 80% of the recommend 400 mg of magnesium daily. Without enough magnesium, your body struggles to generate energy.

Magnesium-rich foods, like navy beans and halibut are good dietary sources of magnesium, but most men, won’t reach the 400 mg recommended daily allowance (RDA) through diet alone. Invest in a 250 mg magnesium supplement for optimal results.  

Vitamin B12

Vitamin B12 is perhaps you brain’s biggest champion. Older men with low levels of B12 lose brain volume faster than those with higher levels.

Vitamin B12 exists naturally in salmon, lamb, and other meats. The most available source is fortified cereal – eat a bowl of 100% B12-fortified cereal with milk each day.

While most men get the RDA of 2.4 micrograms through dietary sources, certain medications, such as acid-blockers and those for controlling diabetes, can contribute to b12 deficiencies. Speak with your physician about tracking your B12 levels if you regularly take acid-blocking or diabetes drugs, and start a supplement regimen.

Potassium

Potassium helps your cells use glucose for energy – this essential mineral keeps your heart beating, muscles contracting, and brain functioning. It also naturally regulates your sodium levels, lowering your blood pressure and reducing your heart attack risk.

Despite the importance of this vital nutrient, up to 70% of men don’t consume the recommended 4,700 mg daily.

Avocadoes are packed with 500 mg of potassium, while bananas contain 400 mg. If you’re not a fruit fan, consider a potato – a single large spud carries 1,600 mg of potassium.

Iodine

Iodine helps control how efficiently your thyroid gland burns calories. Thus, insufficient iodine intake might leave you feeling fatigued or cause you to gain weight.

Don’t rely solely on salt for iodine – not all food manufacturers use iodized salt, and iodized salt itself doesn’t always meet recommended daily intake requirements for this nutrient.

Iodine can be found in nearly sodium-free foods like milk, eggs and yogurt.